Greenways Land Trust wants you to keep your eyes open for knotweed. 

Japanese knotweeds are an invasive species that can negatively affect fish habitat. They look like bamboo with roots that can 20 feet deep. 

Greenways says knotweed uses underground roots and pulling it out can actually make it worse.

“If any of the roots break off, the plant can propagate from there again and because the roots are so deep, that is what makes it such a problem,” summer student with Greenways Jill Fraser said.

She adds that knotweed grows much faster than most other plant species.

“It really outgrows and suppresses and kills them, which makes it have really devastating effects on waterways and riparian ecological systems.”

The most effective way to treat knotweed is by cutting it, then injecting and spraying it with herbicide. 

The length of treatment depends on how big the infestation is. After they are cut and sprayed or injected with herbicide, Fraser says children and pets should stay away from the area for 48 hours. 

She adds that depending on the size of the infestation, there could be an additional three to five treatments after the initial one. 

To join Greenways treatment program, call the office at 250-287-3785 or email info@greenwaystrust.ca